IFRS 9: Modeling Challenges

Calculating expected credit losses under IFRS 9 is easy. It requires little more than high school algebra to determine the aggregate present value of future cash flows. But it is not easy to ascertain the key components that are used by the basic equation—regardless whether the approach taken is “advanced”  (i.e., where PD, LGD, and EAD are modeled) or ”simplified” (also called “intermediate”). The forward-looking stance mandated by IFRS 9 makes the inherently difficult process of specifying these variables all the more complex.

For the sake of brevity, let’s consider only the advanced approach for this discussion. There are two immediate impacts on PD model estimation: the point-in-time requirements and the length of the forecast horizon.

PD estimates need to reflect point-in-time (PIT) rather than through-the-cycle (TTC) values. What this means is that PDs are expected to represent the current period’s economic conditions instead of some average through an economic cycle. Bank risk managers will have to decide whether they can adapt a CCAR (or other regulatory) model to this purpose, determine a way to convert a TTC PD to a PIT PD, or build an entirely new model.

The length of the forecast horizon has two repercussions. First, one must consider how many models to build for estimating PDs throughout the forecast. For example, it may be determined that a portfolio warrants one model for year 1, a second model for years 2 to 3, and a third model for years 3+. Second, one should consider how far into the forecast horizon to use models. Given the impacts of model risk, along with onus of maintaining multiple models, perhaps PDs for a horizon greater than seven years would be better estimated by drawing a value from some percentile of an empirical distribution.

Comparatively speaking, bank risk managers may find it somewhat less difficult to estimate LGDs, especially if collateral values are routinely updated and historical recovery rates for comparable assets are readily available in the internal accounting systems. That said, IFRS 9 requires an accounting LGD, so models will need to be developed to accommodate this, or a process will have to be defined to convert an economic LGD into an accounting one.

Projecting EADs is similarly challenging. Loan amortization schedules generally provide a valid starting point, but unfortunately they are only useful for installment loans. How does one treat a revolving exposure? Can one leverage, and tweak, the same rules used for CCAR? In addition, embedded options have to be taken into account. There’s no avoiding it: estimating EADs calls for advanced financial modeling.

As mentioned above, there are differences between the requirements of IFRS 9 and those of other regulatory requirements (e.g., CCAR). As a result, the models that banks use for stress testing or other regulatory functions cannot be used as-is for IFRS 9 reporting. Bank risk managers will have to decide, then, whether their CCAR models can be adapted with relatively minor modifications. In many cases they may conclude that it makes more sense to develop new models. Then all the protocols and practices of sound model design and implementation come into play.

Of course, it is also important to explain the conceptual basis and present the supporting evidence for PD, LGD, and EAD estimates to senior management—and to have the documentation on hand in case independent auditors or regulatory authorities ask to see it.

In short, given PD, LGD, and EAD, it’s a trivial matter to calculate expected credit losses. But preparing to comply with the IFRS 9 standard is serious business. It’s time to marshal your resources.