IFRS 9: Evaluating Changes in Credit Risk

Determining whether an unimpaired asset’s credit risk has meaningfully increased since the asset was initially recognized is one of the most consequential issues banks encounter in complying with IFRS 9. Recall the stakes:

  • The expected credit loss for Stage 1 assets is calculated using the 12-month PD
  • The ECL for Stage 2 assets (defined as assets whose credit risk has significantly increased since they were first recognized on the bank’s books) is calculated using the lifetime PD, just as it is for Stage 3 assets (which are in default).

To make the difference more concrete, consider the following:

  • A bank extends an interest-bearing five-year loan of $1 million to Richmond Tool, a hypothetical Virginia-based tool, die, and mold maker serving the defense industry.
  • At origination, the lender estimates the PD for the next 12 months at 1.5%, the PD for the rest of the loan term at 4%, and the loss that would result from default at $750,000.
  • In a subsequent reporting period, the bank updates those figures to 2.5%, 7.3%, and $675,000, respectively.

If the loan were still considered a Stage 1 asset at the later reporting date, the ECL would be $16,875. But if it is deemed a Stage 2 or Stage 3 asset, then the ECL is $66,150, nearly four times as great.

Judging whether the credit risk underlying those PDs has materially increased is obviously important. But it is also difficult. There is a “rebuttable presumption” that an asset’s credit risk has increased materially when contractual payments are more than 30 days past due. In general, however, the bank cannot rely solely upon past-due information if forward-looking information is to be had, either on a loan-specific or a more general basis, without unwarranted trouble or expense.

The bank need not undertake an exhaustive search for information, but it should certainly take into account pertinent intelligence that is routinely gathered in the ordinary course of business.

For instance, Richmond Tool’s financial statements are readily available. Balance sheets are prepared as of a point in time; income and cash flow statements reflect periods that have already ended. Nonetheless, traditional ratio analysis serves to evaluate the company’s prospects as well as its current capital structure and historical operating results. With sufficient data, models can be built to forecast these ratios over the remaining life of the loan. Richmond Tool’s projected financial position and earning power can then be used to predict stage transitions.

Pertinent external information can also be gathered without undue cost or effort. For example, actual and expected changes in the general level of interest rates, mid-Atlantic unemployment, and defense spending are likely to affect Richmond Tool’s business prospects, and, therefore, the credit risk of the outstanding loan. The same holds true for regulatory and technological developments that affect the company’s operating environment or competitive position.

Finally, the combination of qualitative information and non-statistical quantitative information such as actual financial ratios may be enough to reach a conclusion. Often, however, it is appropriate to apply statistical models and internal credit rating processes, or to base the evaluation on both kinds of information. In addition to designing, populating, and testing mathematical models, FRG can help you integrate the statistical and non-statistical approaches into your IFRS 9 platform.

For more information about FRG’s modeling expertise, please click here.

IFRS 9: Modeling Challenges

Calculating expected credit losses under IFRS 9 is easy. It requires little more than high school algebra to determine the aggregate present value of future cash flows. But it is not easy to ascertain the key components that are used by the basic equation—regardless whether the approach taken is “advanced”  (i.e., where PD, LGD, and EAD are modeled) or ”simplified” (also called “intermediate”). The forward-looking stance mandated by IFRS 9 makes the inherently difficult process of specifying these variables all the more complex.

For the sake of brevity, let’s consider only the advanced approach for this discussion. There are two immediate impacts on PD model estimation: the point-in-time requirements and the length of the forecast horizon.

PD estimates need to reflect point-in-time (PIT) rather than through-the-cycle (TTC) values. What this means is that PDs are expected to represent the current period’s economic conditions instead of some average through an economic cycle. Bank risk managers will have to decide whether they can adapt a CCAR (or other regulatory) model to this purpose, determine a way to convert a TTC PD to a PIT PD, or build an entirely new model.

The length of the forecast horizon has two repercussions. First, one must consider how many models to build for estimating PDs throughout the forecast. For example, it may be determined that a portfolio warrants one model for year 1, a second model for years 2 to 3, and a third model for years 3+. Second, one should consider how far into the forecast horizon to use models. Given the impacts of model risk, along with onus of maintaining multiple models, perhaps PDs for a horizon greater than seven years would be better estimated by drawing a value from some percentile of an empirical distribution.

Comparatively speaking, bank risk managers may find it somewhat less difficult to estimate LGDs, especially if collateral values are routinely updated and historical recovery rates for comparable assets are readily available in the internal accounting systems. That said, IFRS 9 requires an accounting LGD, so models will need to be developed to accommodate this, or a process will have to be defined to convert an economic LGD into an accounting one.

Projecting EADs is similarly challenging. Loan amortization schedules generally provide a valid starting point, but unfortunately they are only useful for installment loans. How does one treat a revolving exposure? Can one leverage, and tweak, the same rules used for CCAR? In addition, embedded options have to be taken into account. There’s no avoiding it: estimating EADs calls for advanced financial modeling.

As mentioned above, there are differences between the requirements of IFRS 9 and those of other regulatory requirements (e.g., CCAR). As a result, the models that banks use for stress testing or other regulatory functions cannot be used as-is for IFRS 9 reporting. Bank risk managers will have to decide, then, whether their CCAR models can be adapted with relatively minor modifications. In many cases they may conclude that it makes more sense to develop new models. Then all the protocols and practices of sound model design and implementation come into play.

Of course, it is also important to explain the conceptual basis and present the supporting evidence for PD, LGD, and EAD estimates to senior management—and to have the documentation on hand in case independent auditors or regulatory authorities ask to see it.

In short, given PD, LGD, and EAD, it’s a trivial matter to calculate expected credit losses. But preparing to comply with the IFRS 9 standard is serious business. It’s time to marshal your resources.

IFRS 9: Classifying and Staging Financial Assets

Under IFRS 9, Financial Instruments, banks will have to estimate the present value of expected credit losses in a way that reflects not only past events but also current and prospective economic conditions. Clearly, complying with the 160-page standard will require advanced financial modeling skills. We’ll have much more to say about the modeling challenges in upcoming posts. For now, let’s consider the issues involved in classifying financial assets and liabilities.

The standard introduces a principles-based classification scheme that will require banks to look at financial instruments in a new way. Derivative assets are classified as “fair value through profit and loss” (FVTPL), but other financial assets have to be sorted according to their individual contractual cash flow characteristics and the business model under which they are held. Figure 1 summarizes the classification process for debt instruments. There are similar decisions to be made for equities.

The initial classification of financial liabilities is, if anything, more important because they cannot be reclassified. Figure 2 summarizes the simplest case.

That’s only the first step. Once all the bank’s financial assets have been classified they have to be sorted into stages reflecting their exposure to credit loss:

  • Stage 1 assets are performing
  • Stage 2 assets are underperforming (that is, there has been a significant increase in their credit risk since the time they were originally recognized)
  • Stage 3 assets are non-performing and therefore impaired

These crucial determinations have direct consequences for the period over which expected credit losses are estimated and the way in which effective interest is calculated. Mistakes in staging can have a very substantial impact on the bank’s credit loss provisions.

In addition to the professional judgment that any principles-based regulation or accounting standard demands, preparing data for the measurement of expected credit losses requires creating and maintaining both business rules and data transformation rules that may be unique for each portfolio or product. A moderately complex organization might have to manage hundreds of rules and data pertaining to thousands of financial instruments. Banks will need systems that make it easy to update the rules (and debug the updates); track data lineage; and extract both the rules and the data for regulators and auditors.

IFRS 9 is effective for annual periods beginning on or after January 2018. That’s only about 18 months from now. It’s time to get ready.

IFRS 9 Figure 1

IFRS 9 Figure 2

 

 

 

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